National Association of Realtors® Announces Restructuring, Senior Management Team

NAR implements new internal organizational structure and changes to senior management to effectively and efficiently serve its members.

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 19, 2018)

(CHICAGO) NAR – The National Association of Realtors® has announced a new internal organizational structure and changes to its senior management team to more effectively and efficiently serve its 1.3 million Realtor® members.

“This reorganization reflects the promise I made when I was named CEO last August to create better efficiencies in engaging with and serving the association’s members,” said NAR CEO Bob Goldberg. “This restructuring to the internal organization is the most sweeping change in the association’s history, and I’m confident it will drive greater innovation, put more focus on member engagement and satisfaction, achieve a more holistic communications and marketing strategy, and improve the association’s nimbleness and decision-making.”

The new structure, comprised of 10 newly reorganized groups across NAR’s two offices in Chicago and Washington, D.C., results from the merger of several teams as well as the expansion and creation of several groups aimed to enhance services to and engagement with members. NAR consulted outside experts to conduct the organizational design study of its internal structure, processes and staff, and the newly reorganized structure and teams are effective immediately.

“Redefining the staffing structure is an important step toward making sure our members continue to come first,” said NAR President Elizabeth Mendenhall, a sixth-generation Realtor® from Columbia, Missouri and CEO of RE/MAX Boone Realty. “I believe this new NAR will help bring us greater success in achieving the association’s strategic priorities in 2018 and beyond.”

NAR Organizational Changes and Senior Management Team

  • NAR’s Government Affairs and Community and Political Affairs divisions are merged into a new Political Advocacy group, led by newly promoted Chief Advocacy Officer and Senior Vice President Bill Malkasian, who will bring greater synergy to the association’s federal, state and local advocacy efforts.
  • A new Member Experience group will focus on ensuring Realtor® associations and members are highly engaged and satisfied with the association and its many services and offerings. NAR General Counsel and Senior Vice President Katherine Johnson takes on an expanded role overseeing all functions related to Legal, Information Services, Association Leadership Development, and Association and Multiple Listing Service Governance.
  • Communications, Marketing, and Meetings/Events are merged into one group, Marketing, Communications and Events, led by Senior Vice President Matt Lombardi. This group will bring significant enhancements to the way NAR communicates with members, ensuring consistency, continuity, rapid response and accuracy in branding, design and messaging.
  • A new Strategic Business Innovation & Technology group, led by recently promoted Senior Vice President Mark Birschbach, will drive industry innovation and bring benefits to members through strategic relationships with a broad range of business and technology players. Birschbach will oversee NAR’s Realtor Benefits® Program, Center for Realtor® Technology, Second Century Ventures, REach accelerator, top-level domains, and the relationship with Move, Inc., operator of realtor.com®.
  • Commercial and Global services continue under the leadership of Senior Vice President Janet Branton and will continue to focus on delivering service and value to members working in the global and commercial arenas and creating and building partnerships with real estate professionals and organizations around the world.
  • A newly formed Member Development group, led by newly named Senior Vice President Marc Gould, will drive an integrated education strategy for Realtors®. Gould will continue as dean of student services for Realtor® University, oversee NAR’s Center for Realtor® Development, Leadership Academy and the Commitment to Excellence and member financial wellness programs currently in development.
  • The Marketing Research and Predictive Analytics teams will be merged into NAR’s Research group to centralize research and data collection and analysis and will be led by Chief Economist and Senior Vice President Lawrence Yun.
  • Human Resources and employee engagement remains under the oversight of Senior Vice President Donna Gland.
  • NAR’s enterprise technology infrastructure, ecommerce and staff facing Information Technology services, security and support remain under the leadership of Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President Mark Lesswing. The group will also represent NAR on several technical industry standards organizations.
  • The association’s Finance group, overseeing budgets, financial analysis and real estate management will continue to be led by Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President John Pierpoint.
  • A new Leadership Resources team will also be led by Director Erin Campo, who reports directly to the CEO and oversees the operations of NAR’s elected leadership, including coordinating their meetings, travel, outreach activities and initiatives to achieve their visions and goals.

The National Association of Realtors® , “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

[Source: NAR press release]

 

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 Realtor® is a Trademark of the National Association of REALTORS.

For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

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Categories: Mortgage, Real Estate

Oregon House Bill 2737 – The “Tiny House Bill”

Micro-houses have difficulty meeting residential building codes but this bill aims to solve this problem

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 19, 2018)

(PORTLAND, OR – OnlineEd) 

Video transcript:

Perhaps one of the more interesting bills submitted and passed by the Oregon Legislature in its 2017 session is House Bill 2737, known as the Tiny House Bill.

The demand for tiny houses or micro-houses is driven by a number of factors, including the cost of building materials, efforts to reduce the use of energy and natural resources, housing density goals and homelessness. The micro-houses have difficulty meeting residential building codes as these codes were developed for traditional housing forms. The International Code Council, or ICC, has approved new micro-housing standards for inclusion in the 2018 ICC code update. The Building Codes Division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services typically has a lag of one-to-three years before adjusting its codes to reflect ICC changes.

ICC code changes are not necessarily adopted automatically into the Oregon building codes, so what House Bill 2737 does is to require the Director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services to adopt the amendments to the specialty building codes to establish construction standards for homes that are 600 square feet or less. The code addresses such issues as ceiling height, lofts, ladders, and egress.

The codes relating to micro-houses are effective as of January 1, 2018. Click here to sign up for your free 3-hour required Law and Rule Required Course, LARRC.

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

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Refinances Rise to 40% of Total Loans

Closing rates increased across the board with closing rates on all loans increasing from 70.9 percent to 71.2 percent

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 18, 2018)

canstockphoto10268206housepriceincrease(PLEASANTON, Calif.) Ellie Mae – The percentage of refinances rose to 40 percent of all closed loans, up 1 percent from the month prior according to the December Origination Insight Report from Ellie Mae®, the leading cloud-based platform provider for the mortgage finance industry. The percentage of FHA refinances increased to 25 percent of closed loans in the month, up 1 percentage point, and the percentage of conventional refinances increased to 47 percent of closed loans in December, up from 45 percent the month prior.

In December, closing rates increased across the board with closing rates on all loans increasing from 70.9 percent to 71.2 percent, closing rates on refinances increasing from 65.1 percent to 65.6 percent, and closing rates on purchases increasing from 75.5 percent to 76.1 percent. Closing rates also increased across FHA, conventional and VA loans for both purchases and refinances.

“As we closed out 2017 we saw an increase in the percentage of refinances due to seasonality as fewer purchases take place in the fourth quarter, and likely homebuyers were taking advantage of the mortgage deductibility limit before it decreased to $750,000 on December 15th,” said Jonathan Corr, president and CEO of Ellie Mae. “We probably can also attribute some of the increase in closing rates to last-minute efforts by borrowers to close loans before the tax changes took effect.”

Other statistics of note in December included:

  • The percentage breakdown of all closed loans remained steady with conventional loans at 66 percent, FHA loans at 20 percent and VA loans at 10 percent.
  • Closing time for all loans increased slightly to 44 days, up 1 day from the month prior.
  • 30-year interest rates increased to 4.280 from 4.240 the month prior.
  • The percentage of ARMs held steady at 5.6 percent.

The Origination Insight Report mines data from a robust sampling of approximately 80 percent of all mortgage applications that were initiated on the Encompass® all-in-one mortgage management solution. Ellie Mae believes the Origination Insight Report is a strong proxy of the underwriting standards employed by lenders across the country.

In addition to the Origination Insight Report, Ellie Mae also distributes data from its monthly Ellie Mae Millennial Tracker on the first Wednesday of each month. The Ellie Mae Millennial Tracker focuses on mortgage applications submitted by borrowers born between the years 1980 and 1999.

MONTHLY ORIGINATION OVERVIEW FOR DECEMBER 2017

December
2017*
November
2017*
6 Months Ago
(Jun 2017)*
1 Year Ago
(Dec. 2016)*
Closed Loans
Purpose
Refinance 40% 39% 32% 46%
Purchase 60% 61% 68% 54%
Type
FHA 20% 20% 22% 20%
Conventional 66% 66% 64% 66%
VA 10% 10% 10% 9%
Days to Close
All 44 43 43 50
Refinance 41 40 41 52
Purchase 46 45 43 48
Percentage of ARM and Fixed Loan Volume
ARM % 5.6% 5.6% 5.9% 4.6%
30-Year Rate
Average 4.280% 4.240% 4.270% 4.050%

*All references to months should be read as month ended.

PROFILES OF CLOSED AND DENIED LOANS FOR DECEMBER 2017
Closed First-Lien Loans (All Types)
FICO Score (FICO) 722
Loan-to-Value (LTV) 79
Debt-to-Income (DTI) 25/39

More information and analysis of closed and denied loans by loan purpose and investor are available in the full report at http://www.elliemae.com/about-us/news-reports/ellie-mae-reports/.

To get a meaningful view of lender pull-through, Ellie Mae reviewed a sampling of loan applications initiated 90 days prior—or the September 2017 applications—to calculate an overall closing rate of 71.2 percent in December 2017 (see full report).

ABOUT THE ELLIE MAE ORIGINATION INSIGHT REPORT

The Origination Insight Report focuses on loans that closed in a specific month and compares their characteristics to similar loans that closed three and six months earlier. The closing rate is calculated on a 90-day cycle rather than on a monthly basis because most loan applications typically take one-and-a-half to two months from application to closing. Loans that do not close could still be active applications or applications withdrawn by consumers or denied for incompleteness or non-qualification.

The Origination Insight Report details aggregated anonymized data pulled from Ellie Mae’s Encompass origination platform.

[Source: Ellie Mae press release]

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Oregon Real Estate Agency Raises Licensing Fees

Oregon license renewal fees increased for 2018

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 17, 2018)

(Portland, Ore – OnlineEd®)

Activity Old Fee New Fee
Apply for a new real estate license $230 $300
Renew an active real estate license $230 $300
Late renewal of an active real estate license $260 ($230 + $30 late fee) $450 ($300 + $150 late fee)
Renew an inactive real estate license $110 $150
Reactivate an inactive license $75 $150
Issuance of a temporary license $40 $150
Extension of a temporary license $40 $150
Licensee name changes $10 $10
Transfer of licenses between registered businesses names $10 $10
Initial registration of a business name $230 $300
Renewal of a registered business name N/A $50
Change of a registered business name N/A $300
Registration of a branch office $10 $50

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations – Oregon House Bills 2510 and 2511

Once seen as a fad by industry watchers and auto executives, most would now admit that the rise of electric cars seems inevitable.

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 12, 2018)

(PORTLAND-OR) 

Video Transcript:

Once seen as a fad by industry watchers and auto executives, most would now admit that the rise of electric cars seems inevitable. There was a 5% decline in electric vehicle sales from 2014 to 2015. However, sales jumped by 37% in 2016. Final numbers for electric vehicle (EV) sales in the U.S. were recently released in January 2017 and project that electric vehicle sales will continue to increase at a 32% compounded rate for the foreseeable future.

By year-end 2016 there were about 30 different EV offerings, with total sales of 159,000 vehicles. Five different models sold at least 10,000 units in 2016 that were manufactured by Tesla, Chevrolet, Nissan, and Ford. In Oregon, electric vehicles are between two and four times the national average. Between 2010 and 2015, approximately 9,000 electric vehicles were sold in the State of Oregon. In 2013, Oregon joined with seven other states in creating a Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) program to promote the growth of the electric vehicle market. Oregon also has joined with California and Washington to create the West Coast Electric Highway by installing fast-charging stations along Interstate 5.

In response to this increase in electric vehicles, the 2017 Oregon Legislature enacted two bills. House Bill 2510 deals with commercial properties, and House Bill 2511 deals with residential properties. Let’s look briefly at these two bills.

Both bills allow a tenant to install and use an electric vehicle charging station. In the case of a residential tenant, it is to be on a parking spot assigned to the tenant and in the case of a commercial tenant, the charging station is to be located at or near any parking spot assigned to that tenant. The tenant is to be financially responsible for the cost of permitting, installation, maintenance, electricity use, and removal of the charging station. The landlord may prohibit the installation or use of a charging station if the premises do not have at least one parking space per rental unit and may require the tenant to submit an application before installation of the station to ensure compliance with architectural standards and other reasonable restrictions that the landlord might impose.

Charging stations must be installed by certified, licensed electricians. The tenant is also to provide renter’s insurance in an amount of not less than $1 million and name the landlord on the policy if the charging station is not a certified electrical product.

Tenant installed charging stations remain the personal property of the tenant unless a different arrangement between the tenant and landlord. Upon removal, the tenant is to restore the premises to their original condition.

For more information about rule and law changes, enroll in the OnlineEd free 3-hour Law and Rule Required Course.

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Nearly One Quarter of 2017 Home Sales Were Above the Asking Price

The typical price increase for homes that sold above the listed price was 3.1 percent

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 12, 2018)

canstockphoto24925640 price value(SEATTLE, Jan. 11, 2018 /PRNewswire/) — Buyers paid more than the asking price in nearly one quarter (24 percent) of U.S. home sales in 2017, netting sellers an additional $7,000 each. Five years ago, 17.8 percent of final sale prices were higher than the asking price, according to a new Zillow® analysis.

Over the past year the American housing market has been struck by the combination of strong demand and limited supply. Young adult renters are increasingly feeling confident enough to buy, but they are entering a market with very few homes for sale, as inventory has been steadily declining for almost three years. Low-interest rates have buoyed buyers’ budgets, raising the limits on what they can afford – and may be willing – to pay.

Homes sell quickly in such a competitive market, with the typical U.S. home selling in 80 days, including the time it takes to close on the sale. In San Jose, San Francisco and Seattle, the average home sells in less than 50 days. Fierce competition means buyers may not win a home on their first offer. The typical buyer spends more than four months home shopping and has to make multiple offers before an offer is accepted, according to the 2017 Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report.

“Low-interest rates and strong labor markets with high-paying jobs have allowed home buyers in some of the country’s priciest housing markets to bid well over asking price,” said Zillow Senior Economist Aaron Terrazas. “In the booming tech capitals of the California Bay Area and Pacific Northwest, paying above list price is now the norm. In the face of historically tight inventory, buyers have had to be more aggressive in their offers. We don’t expect this inventory crunch to ease meaningfully in 2018, meaning buyers will be facing many of the same struggles this year.”

In San Jose, Calif., San Francisco, Salt Lake City and Seattle, more than half of all homes sold last year went for above the list price. The average home sold above list in San Jose netted sellers an additional $62,000, the largest difference between list and sale price of the metros analyzed.

Over the past five years, Seattle saw the greatest increase in the share of sales that were above the asking price, from 20 percent of home sales in 2012 to 52 percent of sales in 2017. The amount over asking price grew as well, from 2.5 percent to 5.3 percent above the listed price.

Miami homes were least likely to sell for more than the listed price last year, followed by Virginia Beach and New Orleans.

Metropolitan Area Share of Sales
Above List
Price – 2012
Share Of Sales
Above List
Price – 2017
Median Amount
Paid Over List
Price – 2017 (%)
Median Amount
Paid Over List
Price – 2017 ($)
United States 17.8% 24.1% 3.1% $7,000
New York / Northern
New Jersey
6.8% 20.2% 3.3% $12,000
Los Angeles, CA 27.0% 37.5% 2.6% $14,100
Chicago, IL 13.1% 18.5% 2.6% $5,100
Dallas, TX 35.0% 38.9% 5.7% $12,023
Philadelphia, PA 6.1% 16.8% 2.4% $5,100
Houston, TX 27.2% 32.6% 5.0% $9,796
Washington, DC 18.8% 25.4% 1.9% $6,100
Miami, FL 19.0% 11.8% 4.2% $9,100
Atlanta, GA 19.3% 19.6% 2.4% $5,000
Boston, MA 13.4% 40.6% 3.7% $15,001
San Francisco, CA 43.0% 64.5% 6.0% $41,000
Detroit, MI 22.6% 24.0% 2.8% $5,000
Riverside, CA 32.8% 28.8% 1.8% $5,100
Phoenix, AZ 29.0% 16.0% 1.8% $3,600
Seattle, WA 20.3% 52.4% 5.3% $20,100
Minneapolis, MN 16.3% 35.3% 3.0% $6,100
San Diego, CA 24.4% 32.1% 2.1% $10,100
Saint Louis, MO 13.5% 26.2% 4.3% $6,748
Tampa, FL 13.5% 15.6% 2.7% $5,000
Baltimore, MD 10.0% 19.5% 2.2% $5,100
Denver, CO 17.9% 39.5% 2.9% $10,000
Pittsburgh, PA 7.6% 13.7% 2.7% $4,100
Portland, OR 19.6% 41.0% 3.1% $10,100
Charlotte, NC 9.4% 27.0% 2.7% $5,000
Sacramento, CA 34.6% 41.2% 2.5% $9,000
San Antonio, TX 38.9% 42.2% 5.8% $10,913
Orlando, FL 22.3% 16.9% 2.6% $5,000
Cincinnati, OH 9.3% 16.4% 2.3% $3,500
Cleveland, OH 8.6% 18.8% 3.2% $4,300
Kansas City, MO 31.5% 37.8% 4.4% $7,500
Las Vegas, NV 31.4% 25.4% 2.2% $5,000
Columbus, OH 10.1% 32.9% 3.0% $5,100
Indianapolis, IN 34.5% 24.4% 4.1% $5,846
San Jose, CA 49.1% 68.5% 6.8% $62,000
Austin, TX 36.3% 32.7% 6.3% $15,311

Zillow is a registered trademark of Zillow, Inc.

SOURCE Zillow

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Presenting Multiple Offers – Part 3 of 3 (video)

Presenting Multiple Offers, Part 3 of  3 parts

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 11, 2018)

(PORTLAND-OR) Presenting multiple offers can get complicated and have unexpected results. Watch my three-part video, Presenting Multiple Offers.

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Presenting Multiple Offers – Part 2 of 3 (video)

Presenting Multiple Offers, Part 2 of  3 parts

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 10, 2018)

(PORTLAND-OR) Presenting multiple offers can get complicated and have unexpected results. Watch my three-part video, Presenting Multiple Offers. This is the second of three videos in this series. Click here to view the first video.

Did you miss Part 1? Click here to view.

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

Presenting Multiple Offers – Part 1 of 3 (video)

Presenting Multiple Offers, Part 1 of  3 parts

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 9, 2018)

(PORTLAND-OR) Presenting multiple offers can get complicated and have unexpected results. Watch my three-part video, Presenting Multiple Offers.

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For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark

 

 

As Rents Rise, Share of Adults Living with Roommates Higher than Ever Before

Across the country, thirty percent of adults live with a roommate or parent.

By Jeff Sorg, OnlineEd Blog

(January 2, 2018)


canstockphoto1718553 living with parents (SEATTLE) /PRNewswire
 — Nationally, nearly one in three adults live with a roommate or parent, the greatest share ever reported, according to a new Zillow® analysis. As rental affordability deteriorates, more U.S. adults may be choosing double up in order to cut costs.

A doubled-up household is where two or more working-aged adults live together but aren’t married or in a relationship — this could mean two millennial roommates or an adult living with parents. The share of doubled-up households has been steadily rising since the late 1990s, when just 23 percent of adults lived together.

The rise in doubled-up households coincides with increasingly unaffordable rental prices nationwide. Americans making the national median income should expect to put about 30 percent of their monthly income toward a rental payment, but in some markets the share is even greater. In Los Angeles, renters spend almost half of their monthly income on rent. In San Francisco, renters spend 42 percent of their income on rent each month.

“As rents have outpaced incomes, living alone is no longer an option for many working-aged adults,” said Zillow senior economist Aaron Terrazas. “By sharing a home with roommates — or in some cases, with adult parents — working adults are able to afford to live in more desirable neighborhoods without shouldering the full cost alone. But this phenomenon is not limited to expensive cities. The share of adults living with roommates has been on the rise in historically more affordable rental markets as well. Unless current dynamics shift and income growth exceeds rent growth for a sustained period of time, this trend is unlikely to change.”

Metros with the greatest share of adults doubling up also have some of the most expensive rents. In Los Angeles, almost 50 percent of adults live with a roommate or adult parent, the highest share of all markets analyzed. Los Angeles is the third most expensive rental market in the nation, with the median rent at $2,720per month.

Riverside, Calif. and Miami metros also have a high percentage of doubled-up households. In Riverside, almost 45 percent of adults are doubled up, along with 41 percent in Miami. Both metros are among the seven most expensive rental markets when ranked by the share of income going toward the typical rent payment.

When renters decide to move to a new place, a recent rent increase was likely the catalyst, according to the 2017 Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report. Almost 80 percent of renters who moved from a previous rental experienced a rent increase before moving. And when renters start searching for a new place to live, 77 percent indicate that the rental being within their price range is a top requirement.

[Source: Zillow press release]

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Zillow is a registered trademark of Zillow, Inc.

For more information about OnlineEd and their education for real estate brokers, principal brokers, property managers, and mortgage brokers visit www.OnlineEd.com.

All information contained in this posting is deemed correct as of the date of publication, but is not guaranteed by the author and may have been obtained from third-party sources. Due to the fluid nature of the subject matter, regulations, requirements and laws, prices and all other information may or may not be correct in the future and should be verified if cited, shared or otherwise republished.

OnlineEd® is a registered Trademark